Rantings, Links, & Musings

January 23

posted by Jake

Doug Is Back!

Douglas Bowman’s stopdesign.com was my homepage for a very long time when I first started working on the web. Eventually, Doug stopped posting and I was introduced to RSS. I never removed the stopdesign feed from any of the readers I’ve used hoping he’d return some day. Good to see him back.

Update: Bah! Looks like Nick was posting about this at the same time. I guess we’re both happy.

January 23

posted by Nick

Stopdesign Redesigns

A new design for Douglas Bowman’s Stopdesign is launched. This site was very influential in my education as a web designer. I still remember reading Throwing Tables Out the Window, and realizing how my employer was building sites the wrong way.

January 23

posted by Nick

Save Space Without Losing Meaning

Effectively save space in a design with better copywriting. I must admit, if a web page is too wordy I sometimes skip over sections or even the site itself. Oh, how content is so often overlooked.

January 22

posted by Jake

The Inauguration of President Barack Obama - the Big Picture

Regardless of your political positions, this is a fantastic photoset. This explains better than anything I’ve seen recently why I like still photography so much better than video for recording important events (on a national or family level). I just think there is more emotion here than there could be in any other medium.

January 22

posted by Jake

Positioning a Comment Icon in Backpack

Absolutely positioned elements look to their nearest parent with ‘position: relative’ for reference*, and that parent can be an inline element or a block element.

I’ve never really thought about this before, but it allows absolutely positioned elements appear in the proper place in lists, paragraphs, blockquotes, etc. All it requires is the addition of an inline element (span) to make the magic work.

I told you 37 Signals has been posting some great stuff lately. It’s been a while since I ran across a “new” CSS technique.

January 22

posted by Jake

Dummy Text Generator

This is a great Lorem Ipsum generator with lots of handy options—the ability to use english, including paragraph tags in the generated text, setting number of paragraphs, and setting width of block.

January 21

posted by Nick

A Capella & Violin Legend of Zelda Theme

If it involves a capella music and The Legend of Zelda, then I must watch.

January 20

posted by Jake

Brighter Horizons for Web Education

The other A List Apart article this issue also deals with education…

No industry can sustain itself if it doesn’t master the art of cultivating new talent—an art that requires close ties between practitioners and educators. Passively watching education struggle to bridge the divide only contributes to the problem. Aren’t we all sick of complaining about the problem in our companies, in our classrooms, and at every conference? It would seem so, because there’s a movement afoot.

I was going to link to the excellent Opera Web Standards Curriculum, but Aarron Walter has published a much more thorough list.

January 20

posted by Jake

Elevate Web Design at the University Level

Let’s face it. Technology moves fast; academia doesn’t. So how do we teach web design and development—a subject that is constantly changing? How do we prepare our students for the real-world and for real-world expectations? And how do we, as educators, stay up-to-date about the information we are teaching?

Leslie Jensen-Inman has made a big splash this week. First she posted her research, interviews, and sample curriculum on Teach the Web, now A List Apart has published this article based on that research. Where was this when I was developing a training plan for work?

January 20

posted by Jake

Do UK Government Web Sites Need to Look Exactly the Same in Every Browser?

You should check that the content, functionality and display all work as intended. However, there may be minor differences in the way that the website is displayed. The intent is not that it should be pixel perfect across browsers, but that a user of a particular browser does not notice anything appears wrong.

Someone’s getting it.